The Baca / Douglas Genealogy and Family History Blog

Showing posts with label Robert's maternal Baca line. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Robert's maternal Baca line. Show all posts

23 September 2014

Dionosio Antonio Baca and his son-in-law Agustin Torres

Dionosio Antonio Baca was one of the founders of modern-day Socorro, New Mexico. Although Socorro was originally founded in 1598, it had been abandoned before the 1680 Pueblo Revolt and not re-settled until 1815 or 1816. We do not have a list of people who re-settled Socorro; however, we do have a list of people who contributed to a war campaign against the Navajos in 1818. This is the best information that we have regarding who was living there in the early years of its existence. Baptismal records from Belen and Socorro confirm the identities of many of the settlers as well as suggest a few more names.

Dionosio Antonio Baca and Ana Maria Sanchez had at least 10 children. Below is a list of those children:

Individual summary for Dionosio Antonio Baca

I'm going to focus on two of the children: Jose Rafael Baca (1808- 1838) and Maria Felipa Josefa Bonaficia Baca (1767-1838). In my article "A Baca Family in Socorro County, New Mexico 1808-Present" (New Mexico Genealogist 49, December 2010, pp. 196-204), I conjectured that Jose Rafael Baca, who married Maria de Lus Jesus Nepomuncena Baca, was the son of Dionosio Antonio Baca and Ana Maria Sanchez. The problem was that there were many Rafael Bacas in Belen and Socorro, and all I had to confirm Jose Rafael Baca's existence was his son Ramon's marriage record, Jose Rafael's burial record, and his widow's marriage record to her second husband in which she proclaimed that she was the widow of Jose Rafael Baca. By comparing all of the Rafael Bacas in the area, I came to the conclusion that Jose Rafael Baca was the son of Dionosio Antonio Baca. Let's say that this was just an educated guess and not a firm conclusion. There was only one young man named Jose Rafael Baca in the 1833 census of Socorro and the surrounding area. All others had slightly different names, (including his brother Jose Rafael Marcos Baca) and all records mentioned him by his full name rather than by a truncated name (such as Rafael Baca.)

Jose Rafael Baca was my mom's 2nd great-grandfather, through her paternal Baca line:

Relationship chart - Jose Rafael Baca to Frances R. Baca


Maria Felipa Josefa Bonifacia Baca (Felipa, for short) was another one of Dionosio and Ana Maria's children. She married Agustin Torres, the grandson of the founder of Belen, Diego Torres. Felipa and Agustin were among the earlier settlers of Socorro, but may have not been there when it was initially founded. They are not listed among the people who donated goods to the war campaign of 1818. The first record of one of their children being born in Socorro was in July 2, 1823, and that was their son Santiago Torres. It is possible that they moved to Socorro to follow Felipa's parents. It also might be that they were trying to escape the notoriety of her husband's affair with another woman - one of Felipa's cousins. An 1806 prenuptial investigation in Belen indicated that the knowledge of the affair was widespread throughout the community.

Felipa and Agustin had nine children, most of them born in Belen:

Individual Summary - Felipa Baca




Two of Felipa's children are important to my ancestry: Ricardo Torres and Simon Torres.

Ricardo was the grandfather of my great-grandfather Esteban Zimmerly. Simon was the great-grandfather of Esteban's wife, Delfina Torres. This relationship made my great-grandparents 2nd cousins, once removed:


Relationship chart between Esteban Zimmerly and Delfina Torres.



Esteban Zimmerly and Delfina Torres had a daughter by the name of Maria Paublita Zimmerly. Paublita is my grandmother. She married the aforementioned Santiago Baca, the descendant of Jose Rafael Baca. My grandparents were 3rd cousins, once removed:

Relationship chart between Santiago Baca and Maria Paublita Zimmerly

In all, I am descended from Dionosio Antonio Baca and Ana Maria Sanchez three times, all on my mother's side of the family.

Maria Paublita (Zimmerly) and Santiago Baca


Sources:

Robert J. C. Baca, "A Baca Family in Socorro County, New Mexico 1808-Present", New Mexico Genealogist, 49 (December 2010), 196-204.

Robert J.C. Baca, "Early Settlers of the Socorro Land Grant: An 1818 List, Part III," New Mexico Genealogist, 51 (September 2012): p. 119. 

Robert J. C. Baca, "The Zimmerlys of Socorro: A Swiss Civil War Soldier and an Old New Mexican Family", New Mexico Genealogist, 50 (June 2011), 50-59.

18 September 2014

Bacas, Garcia Jurados and a few Torreses and Montoyas for good measure

I've  become a fan of genetic genealogy. I don't believe it can replace conventional genealogy, but it sure can help clarify questions and find distant relatives.

Regarding the latter - I bought the Family Finder test last year, and I've found a few hundred relatives. A few of these relatives have posted their genealogies on the FamilyTreeDNA website. I've noticed a few trends in their genealogies.

First, I have a number of relatives who are related to me through my 4th great-grandparents Dionosio Antonio Baca and Ana Maria Sanchez. My closest relative on the site is Mr. F.M. who shares my 2nd great-grandparents Ramon Baca and Anastasia Padilla (making us 3rd cousins.) Ramon Baca is the the grandson of the aforementioned Dionosio Antonio and Ana Maria. Mr. R.M. is the fourth great-grandson of Dionosio Antonio and Ana Maria - making him my 5th cousin. Mrs. L.V.J.E. and Mrs. D.W are also my 5th cousins through this relationship. Mrs. L.T.A. has them as her 3rd great-grandparents, which makes her my mother's 4th cousin and my 4th cousin, once removed.

Dionosio Antonio Baca is the great-grandson of Ramon Garcia Jurado and his first wife Juana Antonia de Espindola y de las Heras. A number of my relatives are descendants of Ramon Garcia Jurado and his second wife Bernadino Hurtado. This latter couple are my 7th great-grandparents. Mr. F.T., Jr.; Mr. L.C.; Mr. G.G.R.; Mr. N.C.G.; Mr. B.M.; Mr. K.G.S and Mrs. N.C.P. are all descendants of this couple.

Other relatives are related to me through Diego de Torres, one of the founders of Belen, and various Montoya families. Two of my relatives, Mrs. H.M.C. and Mr. M.M., are descendants of Luis Maria Cabeza de Baca, my 4th great-grandfather. H.M.C. is descended from Luis Maria's first wife; both M.M. and I are descended from Luis Maria's 2nd wife.

I have personally contacted only a few of these people. A few of them are friends and genealogical colleagues of mine. One, who is a 5th cousin of mine, is the president of one of the leading genealogy societies in town. Many have roots either in Socorro, Belen or Pena Blanca.

I am still waiting to find a Zimmerly or Bourguignon family member to take a Family Finder test. I would also like to find a closer Torres family (one from Socorro, rather than Belen) on the site.

04 September 2014

The Line of Santiago

As many of you know, my name is Robert James Baca. What you might not know is that my middle name comes from my mother's father Santiago Baca. Santiago literally means "St. James" in Spanish, but is often translated as "James."

When researching my family, I noticed a trend among my ancestors. I call it the line of Santiago.

My maternal grandfather Santiago Baca was born on December 24, 1907, and died on July 19, 1961. Santiago Baca married my grandmother Maria Pablita Zimmerly in 1932.

Santiago Baca's maternal grandfather was Santiago Padilla, who was probably born in the mid 1800s, and married my 2nd great grandmother Maria Albina Trujillo in 1878.

Santiago Padilla's 2nd great grandfather was Santiago Trujillo who was married to Victoria Chaves, probably in the 1760s. He was probably born in the 1730s or 1740s.

The leap from Santiago Padilla and Santiago Trujillo is a bit large (5 generations.) As such, it's unlikely that Santiago Padilla was named after his 2nd great grandfather. However, it does appear that my grandfather was named after his grandfather. You will see that in many Hispanic families, especially those from a hundred a years ago. New Mexicans generations ago were often named after one of their grandparents.

So my middle name seems to go at least as far back as the 1800s, and possibly the 1700s. This is a neat legacy to have.

My grandparents Santiago and Pablita (Zimmerly) Baca

27 July 2014

Juana Maria de la Luz Baca, Daughter of Juan Francisco Baca



The following is an addendum to the article that Patricia Sanchez and I wrote - Robert J. C. Baca and Patricia Sanchez Rau, "Petronila Garcia Jurado: Matriarch of the Rio Abajo", New Mexico Genealogist, 53 (June 2014), pp. 51-60.

Recently, while I was researching another person when I came across a prenuptial investigation of Jose Torres and Maria Serafina Chavez. While reading it, I realized that I was able to prove two things: 1.) That Juana Maria de la Luz Baca's parents were Juan Francisco Baca actually married Manuela Antonia Sanchez; and 2.) Juana Maria de la luz Baca was their daughter. After connecting the dots, I put my findings in my database. Below are the notes I put for Juana Maria de la luz Baca's birth:

The proof of Juana Maria de la luz Baca's parentage can be determined by using three separate sources. The first source is from "New Mexico Marriages: Churches of Immaculate Concpetion of Tome and Our Lady of Belen", page. 24. On 19 May 1800, Jose Maria Torres, (Spanish, 22 years old) the son of Juachin Torres and Xaviera Chaves, married Juana Maria de la Luz Baca, (Spanish, 17 years old) daughter of Don Juan Baca (deceased) and Dona Manuela Antonia Sanchez of the sixth plaza of Belen.

Second, in Fray Angelico Chavez's "New Mexico Roots, Ltd.", pp. 1913 and 1914, there is a prenuptial investigation for Jose Torres and Maria Serafina Chavez. In that investigation, the following relationship is established between the couple:

Petra Garcia            (sister and bro.)          Toribio Garcia
Juan Baca               (1st cousins)               Maria Garcia
Juana Maria Baca   (2nd cousins)              Antonia Montoya
Jose Torres             (3rd cousins)               Serafina Chaves

This indicates that Juana Maria Baca was the daughter of Juan Baca, who himself is the son of Petra Garcia. Petra is also mentioned as being Toribio Garcia's sister. Because of this information, we know that this obviously Petronila Garcia Jurado. Petronila Garcia Jurado had two sons Juan Francisco Baca and Juan Felipe Baca, either one who could have been the Juan Baca mentioned in these two documents.

The third source confirms which Juan Baca is the father of Juana Maria Baca. According to "New Mexico Roots, Ltd.", (volume 1, page 166) on 6 December 1781, a prenuptial investigation was completed for Juan Francisco Baca and his intended Manuela Antonia Sanchez. If the marriage record of Jose Maria Torres and Juana Maria de la luz Baca indicates that her mother was Manuela Antonio Sanchez, and Juana Maria is the granddaughter of Petronila Garcia Jurado, then her father is most assuredly Juan Francisco Baca.




Sources:

Fray Angelico Chavez, New Mexico Roots, Ltd.: A Demographic Perspective from genealogical, historical and geographic data found in the Diligencias Matrimoniales or Pre-Nuptial Investigations (1678-1869) of the Archives of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe. (Santa Fe, New Mexico: typescript, 1982), Vol. 10, pp. 1913 and 1914.

Raymond P. Salas extractor and Margaret Leonard Windham compiler, New Mexico Marriages Churces of Immaculate Conception of Tome and Our Lady of Belen (Albuquerque: New Mexico Genealogical Society, 1994), p. 24.

Chavez, New Mexico Roots, Ltd., Vol. 1, p. 166.



Descendants of Juan Francisco Baca (1st generation only)

1.  Juan Francisco BACA was born before 1727.1 1 He died by 1795 at the age of 68.2

Juan Francisco BACA and Francisca de Jesus SANDOVAL were married on 2 Jan 1749 in Isleta, New Mexico.3 They appeared in the census in 1750 in Belen, New Mexico.4 Francisca de Jesus SANDOVAL died after Apr 1772.5 She was also known as Francisca de Jesus Martin.6

Juan Francisco BACA and Francisca de Jesus SANDOVAL had the following children:

                      i.   Lugardo BACA was born circa 4 Apr 1751 in Belen, New Mexico.5,7 He was baptized on 4 Apr 1751 in Isleta, New Mexico.7
                     ii.   Juan Antonio BACA was born circa 9 Apr 1752 in Belen, New Mexico.89 He was baptized on 9 Apr 1752 in Isleta, New Mexico.9
                    iii.   Antonia Josefa BACA was born circa 13 Mar 1756 in Belen, New Mexico.1011 She was baptized on 13 Mar 1756 in Isleta, New Mexico.11
          2        iv.   Paulino BACA, born ca 29 Jun 1758, Belen, New Mexico; married Maria Lugarda TAFOYA, 26 May 1779, Belen, New Mexico.
          3         v.   Lucas BACA, born ca 1759, Belen, New Mexico; married Maria Paula CHAVES, 3 Jan 1782, Isleta, New Mexico.
          4        vi.   Dionisio Antonio BACA, born ca 1761; married Ana Maria SANCHEZ, 1787, Belen, New Mexico; died 7 Dec 1833, Socorro, New Mexico.
          5       vii.   Juana Maria BACA, born ca 1765; married Jose Francisco PINO, 18 Sep 1780, Isleta, New Mexico.


Juan Francisco BACA and Maria Josefa PINO were married on 7 Aug 1778 in Isleta, New Mexico.5 Maria Josefa PINO died by 1781.10

Juan Francisco BACA and Maria Josefa PINO had the following child:

          6          i.   Juana Lorenza BACA, born ca 1779, New Mexico; married Miguel Antonio CHAVES, 26 Mar 1795, Tome, New Mexico.


Juan Francisco BACA and Manuela Antonia SANCHEZ had a prenuptial investigation performed on them on 6 Dec 1781.10,12 They were married after 6 Dec 1781. Manuela Antonia SANCHEZ, daughter of Diego Antonio SANCHEZ and Ana Maria ALVAREZ DEL CASTILLO, was born circa 1765.12

Juan Francisco BACA and Manuela Antonia SANCHEZ had the following child:

          7          i.   Juana Maria de la luz BACA, born abt 1783, Belen, New Mexico; married Jose Maria TORRES, 9 May 1800, Belen, New Mexico.

Sources: 


        1. "Petronila Garcia Jurado petition," Twitchell # 344, Spanish Archives of New Mexico 1681 - 1821, Series II, Microfilm # 6, Frames 510-523, Albuquerque Genealogy Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico.
        2. Raymond P. Salas extractor and Margaret Leonard Windham compiler, New Mexico Marriages Churces of Immaculate Conception of Tome and Our Lady of Belen (Albuquerque: New Mexico Genealogical Society, 1994), p. 12.
        3. Jose Antonio Esquibel and John B. Colligan, The Spanish Recolonization of New Mexico: An Account of the Families Recruited at Mexico City in 1693 (Albuquerque: Hispanic Genealogical Research Center of New Mexico, 1999), 202.
        4. Virginia Langham Olmsted compiler, Spanish and Mexican Censuses of New Mexico 1750 to 1830 (Albuquerque: New Mexico Genealogical Society, 1981), p. 96.
        5. Fray Angelico Chavez, Origins of New Mexico Families: A Genealogy of the Spanish Colonial Period: Revised Edition (Santa Fe: Museum of New Meixco Press, 1992), pg. 320.
        6. Fray Angelico Chavez, New Mexico Roots, Ltd.: A Demographic Perspective from genealogical, historical and geographic data found in the Diligencias Matrimoniales  or Pre-Nuptial Investigations (1678-1869) of the Archives of the Archdiocese of Santa Fe. (Santa Fe, New Mexico: typescript, 1982), Vol. 8, p. 1498.
        7. Lila Armijo Pfeufer, Margaret L. Buxton transcribers, Margaret Leonard Windham, and Evelyn Lujan Baca compilers, New Mexico Marriages and Baptisms San Agustin de la Isleta Church: Marriages 1726 to 1846, Baptisms 1730 to 1776, 1829 to 1842 (Albuquerque: New Mexico Genealogical Society, 1996), p. 130.
        8. Esquibel and Colligan, The Spanish Recolonization of New Mexico, pg. 320.
        9. Pfeufer, Buxton, Windham, and Baca, New Mexico Marriages and Baptisms San Agustin de la Isleta Church, p. 132.
        10. Chavez, Origins of New Mexico Families: A Genealogy of the Spanish Colonial Period, p. 320.
        11. Pfeufer, Buxton, Windham, and Baca, New Mexico Marriages and Baptisms San Agustin de la Isleta Church, p. 141.
        12. Chavez, New Mexico Roots, Ltd., Volume 1, p. 166.




24 February 2014

Ignacio Baca - POW who died in Manchuria during World War II

On December 12, 1942, Pfc. Ignacio Baca died in the Hoten POW Camp in Mukden, Manchuria. He had been captured in the Bataan Peninsula of the Philippines. He was put on the ship Tottori Maru with 1,200 other men and shipped off to Japan. Because of the terrible crowded conditions on the ship, and the fact that the ship survived both a torpedo attack and a typhoon, the ship was called a "hell ship" by the survivors. Most of the soldiers on the ship were sent to the Manchurian prison camp.


 On June 22, 1943, the El Paso Herald announced the death of Pfc.Ignacio Baca in an article titled "Socorro Man Dies in Prison Camp". The article reads "Pfc. Ignacio Baca, son of Serito Baca of Socorro, N.M., died in a prison camp in Asia, the War Department announced today." The rest of the article mentioned other New Mexicans who died in the war.

Ignacio was born on May 20, 1915. He was 27 years old.

Ignacio was the 1st cousin of my maternal grandfather Santiago Baca.


For more information about Pfc. Ignacio Baca, click on this link. The link is part of the Bataan-Corregidor Memorial Foundation of New Mexico, Inc. website.

A Tragic Fire



 My grandfather's business and his dreams were burned down in 1959. Below is an excerpt from my article "A Baca Family in Socorro County, New Mexico: 1808- Present" (New Mexico Genealogist 44, December 2010, p. 199.)

On Wednesday, March 13, 1959, at 3:30 PM, my grandparent’s business burned down. At the time, only two businesses were operating in the building: Baca’s Clothier’s and Scotty’s Hardware and Appliance Company. The fire apparently started in a locked shop in the rear of the building. Since the phone lines had burned, employees were unable to immediately make a call to the Socorro Hose Company. In little over an hour, the entire building was lost. The only good news was that my grandparent’s home, which was located just west of the building, escaped damage.[1] Two weeks later, it was estimated that my grandfather lost $50,000 in building and stock, while the owner of the other business, J.E. Scott, lost up to $100,000 in merchandise. Neither business owner believed that their insurance would cover their entire losses; my grandfather estimated that only half of his claim would be paid. The newspaper reports at the time indicated that this was one of the worst fires in Socorro history.[2]

Santiago would not rebuild his business. Within two years, he would be gone. Santiago died suddenly at home on 19 July 1961.[3]




Photos of the Baca Clothier/Scotty's Appliances fire
  


[1] “Fire Destroys Two Stores: Scotty’s and Baca’s Clothiers Gutted Today by Roaring Flames”, El Defensor - Socorro County News, Socorro, New Mexico, 13 May 1959, pp. 1 & 8
[2] Untitled caption to three photos of the Scotty/Baca fire, El Defensor - Socorro County News, Socorro, New Mexico, 27 May 1959, p. 1.
[3] "Albuquerque Journal obituaries", Santiago Baca obituary, 20 July 1961. Retrieved from the Albuquerque Special Collections Library databases, retrieved 10 May 2008.